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Endorsing the competence of women leaders helps eliminate the effects of bias

About This Video

In many ways, the playing field of work is still tilted in favor of men. Stanford Professor Shelley Correll explains how errors in judgment and evaluation contribute to a gap in opportunities for women. Evaluations are the gatekeepers to opportunities, promotions, and recognition. It’s natural to look for shortcuts with so much information to process every day. ...

In many ways, the playing field of work is still tilted in favor of men. Stanford Professor Shelley Correll explains how errors in judgment and evaluation contribute to a gap in opportunities for women. Evaluations are the gatekeepers to opportunities, promotions, and recognition. It’s natural to look for shortcuts with so much information to process every day. However, when you rely on your gut instincts as a shortcut to make decisions, mistakes can happen. In this talk, Correll explains how to create solutions that scrutinize the ways individuals and organizations make decisions about people and relationships in order to reduce errors. Doing so, you'll create environments where people have opportunities to do their best and be recognized for their work.

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  • Barbara D. Finberg Director, Clayman Institute

Shelley Correll is professor of sociology at Stanford University and the Barbara D. Finberg Director of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research. Her expertise is in the areas of gender and workplace dynamics. Her recent research on “motherhood penalty” illustrates how stereotypic beliefs associated with motherhood...

Molly Anderson image
  • President, Exponential Talent LLC

Molly Anderson is president of Exponential Talent LLC which specializes in tapping the full performance power of today’s diverse workforce. She is also co-author of the best-seller “The Corporate Lattice: Achieving High Performance in the Changing World of Work.” Previously, Anderson was director of talent for Deloitte Services LP where she led transformative initiatives in the retention and advancement of women,...

Susan Fisk
  • Ph.D Candidate, Department of Sociology

Susan Fisk’s research focuses is on how gender stereotypes influence how women and men perceive risk, perform in risky situations, and how others react to their failure at a risky task.  Other research areas of interest include social-psychology, gender, and economic sociology.  Before graduate school, Fisk worked as a strategy consultant.  Fisk is a Ph.D Candidate in Sociology at Stanford University.  She received...

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  • Executive Talent Development, Genentech

Steven Kowalski provides executive development solutions that impact performance and business aims.  Kowalski works on HR initiatives sponsored by the Genentech and the Roche Executive Committees. These include the design and development of Genentech’s CareerLab, Work and Career Flexibility initiative, Workplace of the Future initiative, and the development a new competency model for Roche. He also is certified in...

Jocelyn Goldfein image
  • Director of Engineering, Facebook

Jocelyn Goldfein is a director of engineering at Facebook. She has led new product releases like News Feed, Search, Questions, and Facebook Camera.  Goldfein has helped scale the engineering organization through a period of hyper growth. She came to Facebook from industry leader VMware where she was the General Manager of the Desktop Business Unit.  Goldfein also directed software development at MessageOne by...

This Discussion Guide includes: 1- Key Points 2- Personal Inventory 3- Practicing Skills 4- One Action 5- Bringing it Home

Research out of Yale University demonstrates that people shift hiring criteria due to gender stereotypes.
A Clayman Insitute Gender News article explains how stereotypes affect the standard we use to judge individuals' performance and influence women's career choices.
According to a Rice University study, reference letters often use stereotypes when recommending men and women for jobs.
This Project Implicit association test reveals how much unconscious bias users have against or towards particular groups.
A Harvard Business School research project explains how Deloitte fostered a more inclusive workforce and reduced turnover among women by reducing stereotypical biases.
A New York Times opinion piece explains how stereotypes play a role in stalling progress toward gender equality.
Author Cali Ressler explains how "results-only" work environments can make employees happier while delivering improved business results.
Authors Cathleen Benko and Molly Anderson argue for thinking about work as a "lattice" rather than a "ladder" — a structure that supports a flexible, collaborative, and dynamic work environment.
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