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Stories are remembered up to 22 times more than facts alone

About This Video

When people think of advocating for their ideas, they think of convincing arguments based on data, facts, and figures. However, studies show that if you share a story, people are often more likely to be persuaded. And when data and story are used together, audiences are moved both intellectually and emotionally. When telling a story, you take the listener on a journey, moving them from one perspective to another....

When people think of advocating for their ideas, they think of convincing arguments based on data, facts, and figures. However, studies show that if you share a story, people are often more likely to be persuaded. And when data and story are used together, audiences are moved both intellectually and emotionally. When telling a story, you take the listener on a journey, moving them from one perspective to another. In this way, story is a powerful tool for engendering confidence in you and your vision. Stanford Marketing Professor Jennifer Aaker demonstrates the importance of story in shaping how others see you and as a tool to persuade. Aaker shares the elements of successful stories and makes the case for developing a portfolio of signature stories. Harnessing the power of story will enable you to be more persuasive, move people to action, and progress into your career.

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  • General Atlantic Professor of Marketing

A social psychologist, Jennifer Aaker is the General Atlantic Professor of Marketing at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business. Her research spans time, money and happiness. She co-authored the award-winning book, “The Dragonfly Effect: Quick Effective Powerful Ways to Harness Social Media for Impact.” A recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award, Citibank Best Teacher Award, and George Robbins Best...

Christy Turlington Burns image
  • Founder, Every Mother Counts

Christy Turlington Burns is the founder of Every Mother Counts, a campaign to end preventable deaths caused by pregnancy and childbirth around the world. In 2010, Burns directed and produced “No Woman, No Cry”, a documentary film about the global state of maternal health. Prior to her work as a global maternal health advocate, Burns focused her activism on smoking prevention and cessation after losing her father to...

Stacy Brown-Philpot image
  • Chief Operation Officer, TaskRabbit

Stacy Brown-Philpot is a leader in operations and strategic management. Before taking the operational helm at TaskRabbit, Brown-Philpot served as Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Google Ventures, lending strategic expertise to the firm’s portfolio companies. Prior to that, she spent nearly a decade leading global operations for Google’s flagship products, including Search, Chrome, and Google+, and serving as Head of...

  • Product Innovation and Marketing Consultant

Erika Shumate is a leader in product development and marketing with work experience with SavvyMoney, a financial services company, and Renewable Ventures.  She has worked in strategic new business development, especially with regard to tax credits to finance solar panel installation.

Shumate received her MBA from Stanford University in 2011 where she served as the co-president of the Product Design and...

Tina Sharkey image
  • Director, Executive, Co-Founder, Advisor

Tina Sharkey has created and scaled multiple consumer and media businesses to profitability worldwide. Most recently she served as the CEO of BabyCenter, LLC a wholly owned division of Johnson and Johnson. With more than 20 years of experience, she co-founded iVillage, led multiple businesses at AOL and started the digital internet division at Sesame Street. Sharkey is a global speaker at industry events, conferences...

This Discussion Guide includes: 1- Key Points 2- Personal Inventory 3- Practicing Skills 4- One Action 5- Bringing it Home

An article about Wharton Business School Professor Deborah Small's research on how using a story, rather than relying on facts, can motivate people to action by triggering their emotions.
Buffer co-founder Leo Widrichshares shares the science of why storytelling is so uniquely powerful.
James Buckhouse, Managing Editor at Twitter, provides tips on how to create concise stories.
Reporter Gayle Tzemach Lemmon uses her personal story and the stories of women she has dicovered in her travels to explain how women entrepreneurs are key, yet often overlooked, in economic development.
6 TED talks on the theme of "How to Tell a Story".
"The award-winning The Dragonfly Effect provides a roadmap that explains how to translate anything--a product, service, or idea-- into a powerful narrative that invites participation and drives results."
Duarte provides necessary guidance for speakers to create visual stories and designing presentations that connect them with their audience and lead them to purposeful action.
Robert McKee reveals the methods that have led him to be regarded as the world's premier teacher on screenwriting and story, while also providing insights into the hidden sources of storytelling, the decisive differences between mediocrity and excellence in storytelling, and how story is about form, not formula.
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