From clean water to heart health, the 2009-2010 Clayman Institute Faculty Research Fellows search for new gender solutions

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From clean water to heart health, the 2009-2010 Clayman Institute Faculty Research Fellows search for new gender solutions

by Admin on Tuesday, December 1, 2009 - 4:11am

Hannah Valantine's presentation on Gender ResearchThe Clayman Institute for Gender Research welcomes a diverse and global cohort of Faculty Research Fellows for the 2009-2010 program. "Bringing together people who have thought deeply about these issues within their own disciplines into an interdisciplinary setting, we all see things differently," comments Londa Schiebinger, Director of the Clayman Institute and Hinds Professor of History of Science. This sentiment echos during the faculty talks which take place at Serra House. During the lunchtime talks, faculty share their work with Fellows and interested Faculty. The talks spark lively conversations that bring together gender perspectives from across Stanford's schools and sister universities. Gender News will feature articles discussing the Fellows work throughout the year. We are pleased to welcome our 2009-2010 Faculty Research Fellows. Jenna Davis Jenna Davis is Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Center Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University. Davis' research interests focus on cost-effective, sustainable water supply and sanitation (W&S) service delivery in developing countries. During her fellowship year, Davis will pursue a new dimension within her research focused on models of decision-making by men and women in low-income countries related to health, education, and investment. Henry Etzkowitz Henry Etzkowitz is Visiting Professor at the University of Edinburgh Business School, United Kingdom, and General Adviser to the International Institute of Triple Helix (IITH) of LaSalle University, Madrid, Spain. Etzkowitz is a scholar in innovation studies as the originator of the 'Entrepreneurial University' and 'Triple Helix' concepts that link university with industry and government at national and regional levels. During his fellowship year,  Etzkowitz will be writing a book together with Professor Marina Ranga called "The 'Vanish Box' of Women in Science: From Academia to Technology Transfer". Ann Grimes Ann Grimes is Lorry I. Lokey Visiting Professor of Professional Journalism and Acting Director of the Graduate Program in Journalism, Department of Communication, Stanford University. Grimes is a former staff writer and editor for The Wall Street Journal where she covered technology and business. During her Fellowship year, Grimes will use her funds to support a research assistant for a case study initiative that focuses, in part, on women entrepreneurs in digital media and media created for women, as well as creating a website showcasing these case studies. Lynn M. Hildemann Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Affiliated Facuty at the Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University. Hildemann's current research projects include  quantifying how much higher someone's exposure to smoke is when he or she is breathing close to a burning emission source like a cigarette. During her fellowship year, Hildemann will investigate how personal exposure to toxic air pollutants may be affected by gender-related factors, such as occupational choices and time typically spent in different locations and environments. Deborah M. Kolb Deborah Kolb is the Deloitte Ellen Gabriel Professor for Women and Leadership, School of Management, Simmons College. Kolb is an authority on gender issues in negotiation and leadership. During her residence at Serra House, Kolb presented a talk on "Too Bad for the Women or Does it Have to Be? Gender and Negotiation Research over the Past Twenty Five Years" to the Faculty Women's Forum. Ulf Mellström Ulf Mellström us Professor of  Gender, Technology, and Work in the Department of Human Work Sciences, Lulea University of Technology, Sweden. Mellström's focus is on technology and masculinity, cross-cultural comparisons of computer science and engineering educations. Mellström will devote his fellowship period to a project titled, "The intersection of gender, race, and cultural boundaries or why is computer science in Malaysia dominated by women?" Anne Firth Murray Consulting Professor, Human Biology, Stanford University. Murray is Founding President of The Global Fund for Women, which provides funds internationally to seed, strengthen, and link groups committed to women's well being. During her fellowship year, Murray will continue developing her teaching and research on social justice and the importance of agape love as an inspiration for service and action, particularly in the context of the health and human rights of women internationally. Debra Meyerson Associate Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Organizational Behavior in the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University. Meyerson's research has focused on conditions and change strategies that foster constructive and equitable gender and race relations in organizations. Meyerson will be devoting her fellowship year to two projects, including the exploration of resilience among those who take up change agent roles within their organizations. Mariko Ogawa Mariko Ogawa Executive Advisor to the President, Director of the Support Office for Women Researchers, and Professor of History of Science and Science Studies, Mie University. Ogawa's teaching and research interests are in the history of biology and medicine in nineteenth-century England and Germany, and in gender in science. She is currently writing a book, Sanitary Measures and Politics in Victorian England (in Japanese). Marina Ranga Marina Ranga is Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Technology and Society, Stony Brook University. Ranga's research interests include the gender dimension in innovation, technology transfer and entrepreneurship. During her fellowship at Stanford, Professor Ranga will be writing a book together with Prof. Henry Etzkowitz - "The 'Vanish Box' of Women in Science: From Academia to Technology Transfer". Sarah A. Soule Sarah Soule is the Morgridge Professor of Organizational Behavior in the Graduate School of Business and, by courtesy, of Sociology, Stanford University. Soules' research has long focused on how social movements impact organizational processes and how organizational theory and models can shed light on social movements. During her fellowship year, Professor Soule will be examining how women's protest in the United States (in the 1960-1995 period) was treated by policing agents. Helen M. Stacy Helen Stacy is Senior Lecturer in Law and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University. Stacy has produced works analyzing the efficacy of regional courts in promoting human rights, differences in the legal systems of neighboring countries, and the impact of postmodernism on legal thinking. During her fellowship, Dr. Stacy will examine the role of courts in ruling on matters of gendered cultural practices. Marcia L. Stefanick Marcia Stefanick is Professor (Research) of Medicine and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University Medical Center. Marcia Stefanick is one of two Iris F. Litt, M.D., Fellows at the Clayman Institute. Stefanick is Principal Investigator of Stanford's (1) Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Center. During her Fellowship year,  Stefanick will participate in the Institute's Gendered Innovations in Science, Medicine and Technology project. Hannah A. Valantine, MD, MRCP Dr. Hannah Valantine is Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine, Senior Associate Dean for Diversity and Leadership, Stanford University School of Medicine. Hannah Valantine is one of two Iris F. Litt, M.D., Fellows at the Clayman Institute. Her current research interests include pathophysiology of transplant related atherosclerosis, with a focus on the role of infection and lipids; heart disease in women; and conduct of clinical trials. During her Fellowship year,  Dr. Valantine will participate in the Institute's Gendered Innovations in Science, Medicine and Technology project. Caroline Winterer Caroline Winterer is Associate Professor of History, Stanford University. Winterer specializes in the cultural and intellectual history of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century America. While a research fellow at the Clayman Institute she will be working on the gender components of Benjamin Franklin's correspondence network. Christine Min Wotipka Christine Min Wotipka is Assistant Professor of Education and, by courtesy, Sociology, Stanford University. Professor Wotipka is the Iris F. Litt, M.D., Director of the Graduate Dissertation Fellowship Program at the Clayman Institute. Her research interests include women and science, international human rights, globalization, and higher education. Professor Wotipka will direct the Graduate Dissertation Fellowship program in 2009-2010. Sylvia Yanagisako Sylvia Yanagisako is Professor of Anthropology, Stanford University. Yanagisako's research interests include gender and kinship, the anthropology of capitalism, transnational cultural processes, and identity. Her current research is on transnational collaborations between Italians and Chinese in textile and clothing manufacturingFor her fellowship, Professor Yanagisako will support her collaborative research and writing with two other anthropologists. Deadline for 2010-2011 Faculty Research Fellowships is December 15, 2009.  The Clayman Institute is accepting applications for for the thematic focus, "Reinvigorating the Revolution: Advancing Gender Equality in the Twenty-first Century".