Jordan-Bloch receives VPGE Graduate Feminist Scholar Award

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Jordan-Bloch receives VPGE Graduate Feminist Scholar Award

Award recognizes outstanding scholarship in feminist, gender and sexuality studies

by Gender News staff on Tuesday, May 14, 2013 - 11:32am

 

Sara Jordan-BlochWhen it comes to negotiation, women generally settle for less than they deserve. Often this is because women haven't learned effective strategies for asking for what they want. Several years ago, Stanford Ph.D. candidate Sara Jordan-Bloch brewed up a solution to combat the gendered implications of negotiation in its early stages. She launched the Acquiring Skills and Knowledge Project, which hosts workshops to teach girls and young women how to negotiate effectively. The project, known as the "ASK Project," trains Stanford undergraduate women in negotiation. They, in turn, lead workshops for local middle and high school girls.

Jordan-Bloch’s work with the ASK Project hasn’t gone unnoticed. There’s now demand to expand the program across the country. It's also garnered attention within the leadership ranks of Stanford’s campus.

Jordan-Bloch "demonstrated passion, determination, and a sincere interest in making a difference in an effort to overcome gender stereotypes in society," said Stanford Women's Community Center Director Faith Kazmi.

Stanford's Women's Community Center recently announced it named Jordan-Bloch as the recipient of the 2013 VPGE Graduate Feminist Scholar Award. The award recognizes outstanding scholarship in feminist, gender and sexuality studies, like what Jordan-Bloch has achieved with the ASK Project. It also recognizes Jordan-Bloch for her work on the Clayman Institute’s Voice & Influence Program and for her PhD research on how students’ self-concepts relate to their performance in school.

Jordan-Bloch "demonstrated passion, determination, and a sincere interest in making a difference in an effort to overcome gender stereotypes in society," said Stanford Women's Community Center Director Faith Kazmi.  "Being an active Ph.D. candidate while taking on [the ASK Project] was very impressive and she also was extremely collaborative in her approach and efforts.  Her contributions through her academic work and beyond it have left a marked difference and will continue to impact those engaged with the project."

Vice Provost for Graduate Education Patricia Gumport noted that Jordan-Bloch is “an inspiring role model for fellow graduate students as well as for undergraduates.”

Jordan-Bloch's expansive commitment to gender scholarship

Fellow graduate student Mana Nakagawa, who has known Jordan-Bloch for over three years, called her colleague an “inspirational mentor” and nominated her for the award.

"This award highlights the university’s commitment to a definition of scholarship that integrates research, teaching and social action,” said Sara Jordan-Bloch.

“[Jordan-Bloch’s] unparalleled dedication to the full enfranchisement of women, both in the academy and in society at large, has touched countless individuals and I believe her to be an ideal candidate for this important award,” Nakagawa wrote in her nomination letter.

Nakagawa points out the ways in which Jordan-Bloch’s commitment to feminist scholarship is embodied in every aspect of her graduate school career. In the 2011-12 academic year, Jordan-Bloch was selected for a Haas Center Graduate Public Service fellowship, which awards students who seek to combine their community and scholarly interests through their professional and civic goals. Now, Jordan-Bloch and Nakagawa are working together with the Haas Center on a research project that asks why undergraduate women are more likely than their male peers to engage in public service.

Jordan-Bloch's social psychological approach to into studying gender in school earned her the Clayman Institute for Gender Research Graduate Dissertation Fellowship from 2012-13. During her year with the Clayman Institute, Jordan-Bloch was a core member of the team that produced the Clayman Institute’s Voice & Influence Program. The initiative creates online curriculum to empower women and men all over the world to be as effective as possible and to create organizations in which people can thrive.

Students in the ASK Project“Working closely with such a vastly accomplished mentor like [Jordan-Bloch] could in any other world, be highly intimidating,” Nakagawa noted. “However, [her] admirable humility and desire to empower and advance others’ skills is truly what lies at the core of all of her success."

Next year Jordan-Bloch will continue her work with the Clayman Institute as a researcher. In addition to working on the Voice & Influence Program, Jordan-Bloch will lead the Seeds of Change initiative, which aims to provide young women and girls with the knowledge and skills necessary to navigate the transition from school to work.

Referring to the VPGE Graduate Feminist Scholar Award, Jordan-Bloch said, “I am honored to be the recipient of this award and thank the VPGE and WCC for their recognition of graduate feminist scholars. This award highlights the university’s commitment to a definition of scholarship that integrates research, teaching and social action.”