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Book Talk with Priya Fielding-Singh, "How the Other Half Eats: The Untold Story of Food and Inequality in America"

December 1, 2021 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Virtual Event
Speaker(s): 
Priya Fielding-Singh
Alison Dahl Crossley

Join the Clayman Institute for Gender Research and co-sponsors, the Center on Poverty and Inequality, and the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society for a conversation with sociologist, professor, and author Priya Fielding-Singh as she discusses her powerful and timely new book, How the Other Half Eats: The Untold Story of Food and Inequality in America.

In the book, Fielding-Singh spotlights the state of our nation’s food injustices through an incisive examination of class, gender, race and health. She transports readers to the frontlines of America’s nutritional crisis through the eyes of four mothers across the income spectrum working to feed their families. The book showcases the tightrope that mothers walk to nourish children while maintaining their dignity in contexts meant to strip them of it. In the process, we learn how exactly gender, economic and racial inequalities make their way onto our dinner plates. Clayman Institute Executive Director, Alison Dahl Crossley, will moderate the discussion.

About the Author

Priya Fielding-Singh is an American sociologist and ethnographer. She is an Assistant Professor of Family and Consumer Studies at the University of Utah and a former Clayman Institute Graduate Dissertation Fellow. Her research and writing examine issues of social and economic justice, with a focus on families, food and health. Her book, How the Other Half Eats, draws on years of research she conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area as a Ph.D. student at Stanford University. Her work has been featured in the Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Harvard Business Review, and more.

RSVP here to attend the event.

Event Sponsor: 
The Clayman Institute for Gender Research and co-sponsored by the Center on Poverty and Inequality, and the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society